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December 19th, 2013 / 1:00 pm
Blind Items & Random

Creeper: My Favorite Facebook Photos of My Facebook Friends for December, 2013

I met Alicia Escott walking along Church Street. I followed her to her studio at which point she turned around and introduced herself. To follow someone you don’t know is a creepy thing to do. Although, there are probably a few of you who might think it romantic. Politically, if you follow someone as an acceptance of their leadership, you may be thought of as a conformist, as someone incapable and unwilling to lead your own life. Within the arts, if you follow someone, you may be thought of as really smart, as a leader among artists, as someone who tries to bring art out of the gallery (if your following takes place out of the gallery) and into the street in order to explore issues such as space, time, and the human body. I follow people when I feel attracted to them, or when I feel bored.

Vito Acconci made great art by following people around the streets of New York City. He is now following you on twitter.

Vito Acconci made great art by following people around the streets of New York City. He is now following you on twitter.

On facebook, instagram, pinterest, tumblr, and twitter one’s social status and self-esteem are determined by the number of followers one has. Some people have made an art out of their tumblr accounts, posting sexy pictures, personal art, their day-to-day activities, and their creative writing. Other people have become so popular on twitter and facebook that they have multiple facebook pages and twitter accounts to accommodate their thousands and thousands of followers.

Winnie the Pooh photo bombs the social media guru SNCKPCK as he pledges allegiance to twitter and all of his 68,800 followers.

Winnie the Pooh photobombs the social media guru SNCKPCK as he pledges allegiance to twitter and all of his 68,800 followers.

It would be silly to believe that the internet is a place where vast fortunes of time allow people to parade their private neuroses and/or personal accomplishments as public exhibitions, or that it somehow magically gathers knowledge for the security state and private corporations, which have come to know more and more about us while we know less and less about them. We are smarter than that. We are artists. We know, for example, that the internet is a special place where curiosity has not necessarily been liberated but bent to corporate profit, and we’re okay with that. We get it. With these things in mind, I humbly introduce the first of what I hope will become a series of posts that celebrate the time I kill at my day job, working on my personal brand while also working to ensure the security and profitability of the corporate state.

My favorite facebook photos of my facebook friends for the month of December, 2013.

Claire Bargout is a poet.

Claire Bargout

Roger Reeves is a poet.

Roger Reeves

Ben McCoy (holding glass)

Ben McCoy

Rob Halpern (center)

Rob Halpern (center)

Michelle Guintu

Michelle Guintu

Paul Corman-Roberts

Paul Corman-Roberts

Tiffany Wines

Tiffany Wines

Mike W. Archibald

Mike W. Archibald

Gilbert Morgan

Gilbert Morgan

Megan Kaminski

Megan Kaminski

Giancarlo DiTrapano

Giancarlo DiTrapano

Lizzy Yzzil

Lizzy Yzzil

Kimberly J. Kim

Kimberly J. Kim

Evan Kennedy

Evan Kennedy

Roxane Gay (in red)

Roxane Gay (right)

Rebecca Bridge

Rebecca Bridge

'Guillaume Morissette'

‘Guillaume Morissette’

Natalie Armstrong

Natalie Armstrong

Robert Levy

Robert Levy

Jayinee Basu

Jayinee Basu

Nick Johnson

Nick Johnson

Neha Talreja

Neha Talreja

Sampson Starkweather (right)

Sampson Starkweather (right)

In Following Piece (1969) Acconci tracked individuals through the streets of New York and into “public” spaces. Each pursuit is carefully documented with photos and time coded text. The chase could last for hours if the subject remains in what Acconci considers public spaces – streets, parks, movie theaters, restaurants – and ends only when the public person “goes private,” entering a residence, a car, and so on.

What seemed to designate a public space for Acconci was his ability to gain access and to not be noticed. Private space begins where one might be denied access or forced to identify oneself. Invisibility is paradoxically present in Acconci’s definition of publicness. As Acconci remains public, unnoticed and unidentified throughout the piece, so does his subject, typically seen from the back, faceless and anonymous.

Alicia Escott is an artist, who I met on the street. We are friends in real life.

Alicia Escott is an artist, who I followed one day. We are friends in real life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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