January 28th, 2010 / 2:20 pm
Author News

SALINGER DEAD

portrait of the artist in the rye

Sad news.  J.D. Salinger has died. Feel free to speculate on the obvious (and I don’t mean cause of death)…

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150 Comments

  1. Paul Habeeb

      From The New Yorker’s website:

      ‘From 1946 to 1965, Salinger published thirteen stories in The New Yorker, including such classics as “A Perfect Day for Bananafish” and “Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters.” There will be much more to come online and in next week’s magazine, but for now, read Salinger’s stories, available to subscribers through our digital edition.’

      Any thoughts on what that means?

  2. Paul Habeeb

      From The New Yorker’s website:

      ‘From 1946 to 1965, Salinger published thirteen stories in The New Yorker, including such classics as “A Perfect Day for Bananafish” and “Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters.” There will be much more to come online and in next week’s magazine, but for now, read Salinger’s stories, available to subscribers through our digital edition.’

      Any thoughts on what that means?

  3. kevin o'cuinn

      Jimmy, respect for taking a stand. JDS has passed; his prose won’t.

  4. kevin o'cuinn

      Jimmy, respect for taking a stand. JDS has passed; his prose won’t.

  5. Charlie

      In his intro to SLOW LEARNER, Pynchon says something about how a young writer should be judged on how seriously he or she confronts the subject of death. I think that several commenters here have, in the words of Thomas Middleton, “been tried, and found to be base metal.” Death hurts, and a lot of people are hurting right now. If you think being a clown at the expense of other’s pain is cute, you need to grow up.*** If nothing else, Salinger exerted a very positive influence on several generations of young people. CATCHER says it’s okay to be sensitive, that being yourself is more important than fitting in, and that you have to be willing to walk the razor’s edge to find truth and meaning.

  6. Charlie

      In his intro to SLOW LEARNER, Pynchon says something about how a young writer should be judged on how seriously he or she confronts the subject of death. I think that several commenters here have, in the words of Thomas Middleton, “been tried, and found to be base metal.” Death hurts, and a lot of people are hurting right now. If you think being a clown at the expense of other’s pain is cute, you need to grow up.*** If nothing else, Salinger exerted a very positive influence on several generations of young people. CATCHER says it’s okay to be sensitive, that being yourself is more important than fitting in, and that you have to be willing to walk the razor’s edge to find truth and meaning.

  7. ryan

      : (

  8. ryan

      : (

  9. jim bling

      STFU. NOBODY cares what you think.

  10. jim bling

      STFU. NOBODY cares what you think.

  11. Thelma

      Dibs.

  12. Thelma

      Dibs.

  13. .

      He was 91. He died of old age. It’s okay. People die. He spent his time well. This should make you happy, not sad. The purpose of life is to live well and die with dignity. He did it. He won the game. Maybe he even got a high score.

  14. .

      He was 91. He died of old age. It’s okay. People die. He spent his time well. This should make you happy, not sad. The purpose of life is to live well and die with dignity. He did it. He won the game. Maybe he even got a high score.

  15. Matt K

      Can you explain what you mean? How has he been dead for years?

  16. Matt K

      Can you explain what you mean? How has he been dead for years?

  17. Gian

      I cant help it. I’m freaked out. What is the pun?

  18. Gian

      I cant help it. I’m freaked out. What is the pun?

  19. nick diaz

      well, maybe pun is the wrong word. i’m a fighter, forgive me. catcher in the rye, while greatness, had about 20 references to it raining like a bastard. don’t hit me, please, i have a fight saturday.

  20. nick diaz

      well, maybe pun is the wrong word. i’m a fighter, forgive me. catcher in the rye, while greatness, had about 20 references to it raining like a bastard. don’t hit me, please, i have a fight saturday.

  21. ZZZZIPP

      even zzzipp gets tired of the “z’s”

      it’s a really stupid line you have to walk, being an annoying gimmicky commenter

  22. ZZZZIPP

      even zzzipp gets tired of the “z’s”

      it’s a really stupid line you have to walk, being an annoying gimmicky commenter

  23. christian

      None of the posts on this thread got me worked up one way or another, but this is a really young response here. First, you can confront death very seriously with humor. Second, a 91 year old man died, according to reports, painlessly. Ninety-one years and a peaceful death sounds like a gift, the kind of thing grown-ups could celebrate. Finally, and I say this as a huge admirer of Salinger’s work, no one over 16 should be taking lessons from Catcher in the Rye. It’s a moving book and a stylistic triumph and a comfort to people at a certain point in life (and maybe a reminder afterward), but as romantic as he is, Holden Caulfield acts mostly like a spoiled child.

  24. christian

      None of the posts on this thread got me worked up one way or another, but this is a really young response here. First, you can confront death very seriously with humor. Second, a 91 year old man died, according to reports, painlessly. Ninety-one years and a peaceful death sounds like a gift, the kind of thing grown-ups could celebrate. Finally, and I say this as a huge admirer of Salinger’s work, no one over 16 should be taking lessons from Catcher in the Rye. It’s a moving book and a stylistic triumph and a comfort to people at a certain point in life (and maybe a reminder afterward), but as romantic as he is, Holden Caulfield acts mostly like a spoiled child.

  25. ZZZZIPP

      I love/loved Salinger, Gian. I don’t think anyone here has said they don’t?

  26. ZZZZIPP

      I love/loved Salinger, Gian. I don’t think anyone here has said they don’t?

  27. Gian

      I wasn’t speaking to anyone directly on here, I was just thinking out loud. Didn’t mean to come off weird.

  28. Gian

      I wasn’t speaking to anyone directly on here, I was just thinking out loud. Didn’t mean to come off weird.

  29. Gian

      Did you guys know that Holden’s middle name is Morrisey?

  30. Gian

      Did you guys know that Holden’s middle name is Morrisey?

  31. drew kalbach

      hasn’t published anything, hasn’t done interviews, didn’t teach, wasn’t active within any community. he’s basically been dead as far as the lit community is concerned.

      that being said, i didn’t follow his life/career, so i could have missed something.

  32. drew kalbach

      hasn’t published anything, hasn’t done interviews, didn’t teach, wasn’t active within any community. he’s basically been dead as far as the lit community is concerned.

      that being said, i didn’t follow his life/career, so i could have missed something.

  33. drew kalbach

      didn’t he die yesterday?

  34. drew kalbach

      didn’t he die yesterday?

  35. ryan

      Thank you.

  36. ryan

      Thank you.

  37. ZZZZIPP

      I don’t get these negative reactions to the above comments… Salinger’s death is certainly not a tragedy–he was 91. Still sad that he’s gone, but I think when you get that old you kind of start to look forward to death (everyone I’ve talked to around that age has given me that impression, anyway).

      I was his “friend” in the sense that I read and loved his books, but, if anything, my “friendship” with him is only going to get better in the coming months/years. It’s bittersweet, yes, but damn. What did we say up there? Salinger is “eternal”. He’ll outlast you and me. Since when does death mean this website ceases to be a forum on the internet? Do you know what I’ve read in the comments section of a major national newspaper regarding this story? Much, much, worse. At least no one here directly attacked him/his work.

      You may have had a different relationship with Salinger, but considering no one here knew him, isn’t it a little bit weird to expect everyone else to react in the same way?

      How many people here have lost real friends or relatives, people that they loved and who maybe cared for them, in the past few months–or will in the near future? I care more about that. Salinger was 91. He will be mourned. But damn! He was 91! He had a pretty killer life! What is there to be sad about?

  38. ZZZZIPP

      I don’t get these negative reactions to the above comments… Salinger’s death is certainly not a tragedy–he was 91. Still sad that he’s gone, but I think when you get that old you kind of start to look forward to death (everyone I’ve talked to around that age has given me that impression, anyway).

      I was his “friend” in the sense that I read and loved his books, but, if anything, my “friendship” with him is only going to get better in the coming months/years. It’s bittersweet, yes, but damn. What did we say up there? Salinger is “eternal”. He’ll outlast you and me. Since when does death mean this website ceases to be a forum on the internet? Do you know what I’ve read in the comments section of a major national newspaper regarding this story? Much, much, worse. At least no one here directly attacked him/his work.

      You may have had a different relationship with Salinger, but considering no one here knew him, isn’t it a little bit weird to expect everyone else to react in the same way?

      How many people here have lost real friends or relatives, people that they loved and who maybe cared for them, in the past few months–or will in the near future? I care more about that. Salinger was 91. He will be mourned. But damn! He was 91! He had a pretty killer life! What is there to be sad about?

  39. Matt Cozart

      so, to be any kind of “living author”, you have to be “active within the lit community”? i’m sorry, but that’s completely inane.

  40. Matt Cozart

      so, to be any kind of “living author”, you have to be “active within the lit community”? i’m sorry, but that’s completely inane.

  41. Matt Cozart

      amen

  42. Matt Cozart

      amen

  43. drew kalbach

      no. that isn’t my point and i’m not elaborating.

  44. drew kalbach

      no. that isn’t my point and i’m not elaborating.

  45. jack

      well argued

  46. jack

      well argued

  47. jack

      requisite flood of obits, tributes and summing up appraisals of his work from any number of writers, critics and book reviewers. as well as a great new marketing angle for the nyer. so subscribe today, and catch post-salinger fever!

  48. jack

      requisite flood of obits, tributes and summing up appraisals of his work from any number of writers, critics and book reviewers. as well as a great new marketing angle for the nyer. so subscribe today, and catch post-salinger fever!

  49. jack

      i did not. nice. reading thru this thread wasn’t a whole dumb waste after all.

  50. jack

      i did not. nice. reading thru this thread wasn’t a whole dumb waste after all.