Mein Kampf Revisted

Posted by @ 2:34 pm on February 14th, 2012

Blake Butler’s domination in the lit world seems so assured that now not only can he call himself Blake Butler again, but he ruthlessly admits his ultimate internet and political designs. A section of his laptop openly owns itself to be a nightmare, yet even here it lies. For while his publishers try to make the rest of the world believe that the internet consciousness of Blake Butler finds its satisfaction in the creation of an online lit world, the Blake Butlers again slyly dupe the dumb reader. It doesn’t even enter their heads to build up a Blake Butlerish lit world online for the purpose of living there; all they want is a central organization for their internet world swindle, endowed with its own blogging rights and removed from the intervention of other lit worlds: a haven for convicted scoundrels and a university for budding crooks.

With satanic joy in his face, the black-haired Blake Butlerish youth lurks in wait for the unsuspecting twitter follower whom he defiles with his blood, thus stealing her from her people. With every means he tries to destroy the literary foundations of the people he has set out to subjugate. Just as he himself systematically ruins women and twitter followers, he does not shrink back from pulling down the blood barriers for others, even on a large scale. It was and it is Blake Butlers who bring the unpublished into the htmlgiant comments, always with the same secret thought and clear aim of ruining the hated white laptop by the necessarily resulting bastardization, throwing it down from its cultural and political height, and himself rising to be its master.

KEY:

Jew → Blake Butler

State → lit world

the Zionists → his publishers

National → internet

Goyim → reader

Race → laptop

Racial → literary

Sovereign → blogging

 Palestine/Palestinian → online

Rhineland → htmlgiant comments

Negroes → unpublished

foreign people → nightmare

girl → twitter follower

Original text excerpted from Adolf Hitler, Mein Kampf (“My Struggle”), Houghton Mifflin, New York, Hutchinson Publ. Ltd., London, 1969 ed.; this post has been slightly edited for grammatical consistency.