October 22nd, 2009 / 1:22 pm
Snippets

Who has seen Where the Wild Things Are? Is it worth the time and money? Feels like they are trying too hard to get me to go to the movie. But, you know.

240 Comments

  1. Ryan

      “it’s also a nearly unbelievable document of the depths human beings will go in the name of creating a product, not to mention a remarkably well-made piece of exploitation”

      So true.

      I still have those images in my head. Help!

  2. Nathan (Nate) Tyree

      Agreed to. I saw it because it was described to me as Blair Witch (which I liked) meets Bloodsucking Freaks (which I didn’t like, but was oddly fascinated by). It wasn’t that at all, though. While BSF was obviously fake guignol, CH used some reality to blur the lines.

  3. Nathan (Nate) Tyree

      Agreed to. I saw it because it was described to me as Blair Witch (which I liked) meets Bloodsucking Freaks (which I didn’t like, but was oddly fascinated by). It wasn’t that at all, though. While BSF was obviously fake guignol, CH used some reality to blur the lines.

  4. Nathan (Nate) Tyree

      Agreed to. I saw it because it was described to me as Blair Witch (which I liked) meets Bloodsucking Freaks (which I didn’t like, but was oddly fascinated by). It wasn’t that at all, though. While BSF was obviously fake guignol, CH used some reality to blur the lines.

  5. Nathan (Nate) Tyree

      Yes. All who saw it need help

  6. Nathan (Nate) Tyree

      Yes. All who saw it need help

  7. Nathan (Nate) Tyree

      Yes. All who saw it need help

  8. Ross Brighton

      on a similar (or not) note there’s an incredibly hateful review of Lars Von Trier’s Antichrist in the latest Art Forum (or Art in America – I’m not sure) that makes me think if I see it it’ll be out of curiosity rather than anything else. Though the reviewer described it as equal parts sophomore-student-esque (and distasteful) gender politics meets torture porn, which I’m not so curious about.

  9. Ross Brighton

      on a similar (or not) note there’s an incredibly hateful review of Lars Von Trier’s Antichrist in the latest Art Forum (or Art in America – I’m not sure) that makes me think if I see it it’ll be out of curiosity rather than anything else. Though the reviewer described it as equal parts sophomore-student-esque (and distasteful) gender politics meets torture porn, which I’m not so curious about.

  10. Ross Brighton

      on a similar (or not) note there’s an incredibly hateful review of Lars Von Trier’s Antichrist in the latest Art Forum (or Art in America – I’m not sure) that makes me think if I see it it’ll be out of curiosity rather than anything else. Though the reviewer described it as equal parts sophomore-student-esque (and distasteful) gender politics meets torture porn, which I’m not so curious about.

  11. Ross Brighton

      Cheever! lol

  12. Ross Brighton

      Cheever! lol

  13. Ross Brighton

      Cheever! lol

  14. rachel

      I can’t decide whether to see it or not. I mean, it’s not like those animals will spring back to life if I don’t watch it. And I can watch a bootleg, so I don’t have to support the cruelty. Meanwhile, I write comedy and am inspired by some of the darkest things (parody of “Threads,” a sketch about Jim Jones, etc.) and if it’s morally abhorrent then it should be ripe as an object of satire, right? Like, ‘who are the jerks who made this?’ Because comedy can be about mocking the cruel impulse. But I can’t do that if I haven’t seen it, and I am somewhat afraid that there won’t even be grist for that mill, it will just be awful and ugly and pointless and scarring, etc.

  15. rachel

      I can’t decide whether to see it or not. I mean, it’s not like those animals will spring back to life if I don’t watch it. And I can watch a bootleg, so I don’t have to support the cruelty. Meanwhile, I write comedy and am inspired by some of the darkest things (parody of “Threads,” a sketch about Jim Jones, etc.) and if it’s morally abhorrent then it should be ripe as an object of satire, right? Like, ‘who are the jerks who made this?’ Because comedy can be about mocking the cruel impulse. But I can’t do that if I haven’t seen it, and I am somewhat afraid that there won’t even be grist for that mill, it will just be awful and ugly and pointless and scarring, etc.

  16. rachel

      I can’t decide whether to see it or not. I mean, it’s not like those animals will spring back to life if I don’t watch it. And I can watch a bootleg, so I don’t have to support the cruelty. Meanwhile, I write comedy and am inspired by some of the darkest things (parody of “Threads,” a sketch about Jim Jones, etc.) and if it’s morally abhorrent then it should be ripe as an object of satire, right? Like, ‘who are the jerks who made this?’ Because comedy can be about mocking the cruel impulse. But I can’t do that if I haven’t seen it, and I am somewhat afraid that there won’t even be grist for that mill, it will just be awful and ugly and pointless and scarring, etc.

  17. Nick

      I believe you can watch Cannibal Holocaust in its entirety here:

      http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8139367795876917425#

      I wouldn’t recommend it, though. It’s a cultural artifact. But it’s very ugly. I would never watch it again.

      Antichrist is interesting viewing, though. Some parts are actually very beautiful, although it’s ludicrous in the aggregate. At the NYFF, von Trier said he didn’t even bother revising the early draft of the script, and if he hadn’t been so depressed when he made it, he would have cut a lot out.

  18. Nick

      I believe you can watch Cannibal Holocaust in its entirety here:

      http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8139367795876917425#

      I wouldn’t recommend it, though. It’s a cultural artifact. But it’s very ugly. I would never watch it again.

      Antichrist is interesting viewing, though. Some parts are actually very beautiful, although it’s ludicrous in the aggregate. At the NYFF, von Trier said he didn’t even bother revising the early draft of the script, and if he hadn’t been so depressed when he made it, he would have cut a lot out.

  19. Nick

      I believe you can watch Cannibal Holocaust in its entirety here:

      http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8139367795876917425#

      I wouldn’t recommend it, though. It’s a cultural artifact. But it’s very ugly. I would never watch it again.

      Antichrist is interesting viewing, though. Some parts are actually very beautiful, although it’s ludicrous in the aggregate. At the NYFF, von Trier said he didn’t even bother revising the early draft of the script, and if he hadn’t been so depressed when he made it, he would have cut a lot out.

  20. peter berghoef

      I thought it was worth a couple of bucks. I liked it.

  21. peter berghoef

      I thought it was worth a couple of bucks. I liked it.

  22. peter berghoef

      I thought it was worth a couple of bucks. I liked it.

  23. peter berghoef

      the owls ruled. as did the very brief appearance of a cat. I don’t think the cat had a name.

  24. peter berghoef

      the owls ruled. as did the very brief appearance of a cat. I don’t think the cat had a name.

  25. peter berghoef

      the owls ruled. as did the very brief appearance of a cat. I don’t think the cat had a name.

  26. Justin Rands

      I saw it yesterday with my brother. Fished out 19 dollars for it. 6 dollars for popcorn, which ended up falling on the floor during the movie. I definitely connected with the nostaligic feelings it gave about the lonliness of childhood and overwhelming emotions you can’t really understand at that age but….

      There were times (during the dirt ball fight, or Max’s first order of business of going wild) where I was bored to tears and disconnected. The music montage and quick cuts. Not to mention the fact that the wild things were the saddest creatures ever created. Depressing as hell. Parts realllly drag too…

      But, I agree with everything said above. Visually it was incredible though. I wouldn’t wait to watch it on a smaller screen. You may hate it entirely.

  27. Justin Rands

      I saw it yesterday with my brother. Fished out 19 dollars for it. 6 dollars for popcorn, which ended up falling on the floor during the movie. I definitely connected with the nostaligic feelings it gave about the lonliness of childhood and overwhelming emotions you can’t really understand at that age but….

      There were times (during the dirt ball fight, or Max’s first order of business of going wild) where I was bored to tears and disconnected. The music montage and quick cuts. Not to mention the fact that the wild things were the saddest creatures ever created. Depressing as hell. Parts realllly drag too…

      But, I agree with everything said above. Visually it was incredible though. I wouldn’t wait to watch it on a smaller screen. You may hate it entirely.

  28. Justin Rands

      I saw it yesterday with my brother. Fished out 19 dollars for it. 6 dollars for popcorn, which ended up falling on the floor during the movie. I definitely connected with the nostaligic feelings it gave about the lonliness of childhood and overwhelming emotions you can’t really understand at that age but….

      There were times (during the dirt ball fight, or Max’s first order of business of going wild) where I was bored to tears and disconnected. The music montage and quick cuts. Not to mention the fact that the wild things were the saddest creatures ever created. Depressing as hell. Parts realllly drag too…

      But, I agree with everything said above. Visually it was incredible though. I wouldn’t wait to watch it on a smaller screen. You may hate it entirely.

  29. Tim Jones-Yelvington

      b/c it really isn’t abt “wild/anarchic fantasy life”, it’s more loneliness and deep, deep disappointment in everybody else around him. Reminded me of being eight years old and trying to do plays w/ the other kids who lived on my block, and when they wouldn’t say the lines the way I wanted them said, picking up heavy objects and throwing them at their heads, and then running away and locking myself in the bathroom. In this way, I related to it a great deal. I think it appeals far more to folks whose fantasy lives were heavily structured, frighteningly specific and fraught with unmet expectations.

  30. Tim Jones-Yelvington

      b/c it really isn’t abt “wild/anarchic fantasy life”, it’s more loneliness and deep, deep disappointment in everybody else around him. Reminded me of being eight years old and trying to do plays w/ the other kids who lived on my block, and when they wouldn’t say the lines the way I wanted them said, picking up heavy objects and throwing them at their heads, and then running away and locking myself in the bathroom. In this way, I related to it a great deal. I think it appeals far more to folks whose fantasy lives were heavily structured, frighteningly specific and fraught with unmet expectations.

  31. Tim Jones-Yelvington

      The line was the sister, on the telephone, telling her friend she had to visit her dad so couldn’t participate in some activity.

  32. Tim Jones-Yelvington

      The line was the sister, on the telephone, telling her friend she had to visit her dad so couldn’t participate in some activity.

  33. Tim Jones-Yelvington

      I appreciate fantasy worlds grounded in something that resembles our reality. I’ve really never understood this “either/or” sentiment so many folks express.

  34. Tim Jones-Yelvington

      I appreciate fantasy worlds grounded in something that resembles our reality. I’ve really never understood this “either/or” sentiment so many folks express.

  35. sasha fletcher

      “b/c it really isn’t abt “wild/anarchic fantasy life”, it’s more loneliness and deep, deep disappointment in everybody else around him. Reminded me of being eight years old and trying to do plays w/ the other kids who lived on my block, and when they wouldn’t say the lines the way I wanted them said, picking up heavy objects and throwing them at their heads, and then running away and locking myself in the bathroom. In this way, I related to it a great deal. I think it appeals far more to folks whose fantasy lives were heavily structured, frighteningly specific and fraught with unmet expectations.”

      as someone who’s fantasy life was a lot like the one described above, i can probably say that maybe that’s why i liked it so much.

      also, visually, it was pretty great. there is something about seeing costumes used in place of computers [yeah alright, they used computers to make the mouths move], there is something, for me, involving a need to see something that looks real. i don’t know. i thought that visually it was great, and i liked it. whatever.

      sadness and loneliness and birds being pulled out of the sky. that bit where k.w. hides max inside of her? that was awesome. seriously. it was fucking awesome.

      and the stick for an arm?

  36. sasha fletcher

      “b/c it really isn’t abt “wild/anarchic fantasy life”, it’s more loneliness and deep, deep disappointment in everybody else around him. Reminded me of being eight years old and trying to do plays w/ the other kids who lived on my block, and when they wouldn’t say the lines the way I wanted them said, picking up heavy objects and throwing them at their heads, and then running away and locking myself in the bathroom. In this way, I related to it a great deal. I think it appeals far more to folks whose fantasy lives were heavily structured, frighteningly specific and fraught with unmet expectations.”

      as someone who’s fantasy life was a lot like the one described above, i can probably say that maybe that’s why i liked it so much.

      also, visually, it was pretty great. there is something about seeing costumes used in place of computers [yeah alright, they used computers to make the mouths move], there is something, for me, involving a need to see something that looks real. i don’t know. i thought that visually it was great, and i liked it. whatever.

      sadness and loneliness and birds being pulled out of the sky. that bit where k.w. hides max inside of her? that was awesome. seriously. it was fucking awesome.

      and the stick for an arm?

  37. sasha fletcher

      there was a kid behind me who seemed pretty into it.
      only people that walked out when i saw it was a 30-something couple.
      there were a bunch of people who looked to be in their 30’s [or at least seemingly substantially older than 24] that were saying that they just didn’t find any of it believable and that it ruined the book for them.
      i don’t know. you can come in waiting to see what will happen or you can do whatever else it is that people do. i understand that the audience is going to bring their own baggage to the work.
      i don’t know. my disbelief was successfully suspended.
      people are probably going to get out of a thing whatever they want to get out of a thing.
      this could be wrong.

  38. sasha fletcher

      there was a kid behind me who seemed pretty into it.
      only people that walked out when i saw it was a 30-something couple.
      there were a bunch of people who looked to be in their 30’s [or at least seemingly substantially older than 24] that were saying that they just didn’t find any of it believable and that it ruined the book for them.
      i don’t know. you can come in waiting to see what will happen or you can do whatever else it is that people do. i understand that the audience is going to bring their own baggage to the work.
      i don’t know. my disbelief was successfully suspended.
      people are probably going to get out of a thing whatever they want to get out of a thing.
      this could be wrong.

  39. sasha fletcher

      and the raccoon, whose name i forget.

  40. sasha fletcher

      and the raccoon, whose name i forget.