Posts Tagged ‘josh maday’

{LMC}: They Have Not Been Nice

Saturday, November 13th, 2010

If you would like to have the full PDF of NY Tyrant 8 so you can participate in this month’s LMC discussions, get in touch with me. But still, when you buy a literary magazine, an angel gets its wings.

It’s true: The editors of New York Tyrant have given me a stern talking-to. They’ve cleaned a few small clocks. Instead of prudently pussy-footing their way along the long shore of mainstream taste, as do some editors who purport to be “open to experimental literature” (carelessly using the derogatory term): the Tyrant’s editors have chosen bravely to lead us into the wild and brilliant, mind-losing woods and then lead us back out, then lose us into the woods again, then lead us out, then get us happily lost yet again. But, of course: I already knew what the Tyrant has purported to be about — I knew what they were interested in. Therefore: their tactic was not a surprise. I thought I would live with it, and now I live with it.

There are two ways to read a print journal. If you’re like me then you’ll begin reading New York Tyrant #8 at approximately two-thirds of the way through, with the first piece that grabs your eye, this being, in this case, Josh Maday’s spooky, fragmentary Dark Math.

This is the sort of material one reads literary journals to discover. Maday is now on my watch-list.

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Thursday, November 12th, 2009

Nice William Burroughs interview with the Paris Review [via Josh Maday’s twitter feed, which is always linking great web things, follow him.]

INTERVIEWER: Is it true that you did a great deal of acting out to create your characters when you were finishing Naked Lunch?

BURROUGHS: Excuse me, there is no accurate description of the creation of a book, or an event.

Devine Interview

Tuesday, August 4th, 2009

An English sentence can expand and expand and it can do it with conjunctions (or clauses) — also qualifiers like adjectives and adverbs — but a greatly expanded English sentence is not so different from an English sentence that hasn’t been greatly expanded.

An Interview with Andy Devine
by
Josh Maday

(in the newest installment of elimae)