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Nick Antosca

http://brothercyst.blogspot.com/

Nick Antosca is the author of two novels: Fires (2006, Impetus Press) and Midnight Picnic (2009, Word Riot Press). Antosca was born in Louisiana and currently lives in New York City.

SLEEPING BEAUTY: A FEW WORDS ON MY FAVORITE MOVIE OF 2011

Dave Bowman as naked girl?

Sleeping Beauty, the mesmerizing, disquieting first film directed by Australian novelist Julia Leigh, was the most psychologically penetrating work in any medium that I encountered this year.  It’s weird how the most impenetrable works can also be the most penetrating.

Leigh seems to get that paradox.  “My vagina is not a temple,” says Lucy, assuring her prospective employer that she has no problem with taking sleeping pills and allowing wealthy men access to her nude, unconscious body.  “Nevertheless, you will not be penetrated,” the madame promises. READ MORE >

Film / 20 Comments
December 22nd, 2011 / 11:45 am

Some of you know Innocente Fontana, so I thought this might be of interest: I wrote a piece for the Paris Review‘s website about my relationship with him, who he really is, and his extraordinary novel that was just republished.

And this is what we call fishing for outrage. Anyways, off to go read American Psycho again.

ZOETROPE, PLEASE.

I got an email from Zoetrope with the subject line: “Fall Preview!  The Horror Issue” and my first thought was, Awesome, I’ll probably have to resubscribe to Zoetrope: All Story.

Then I opened it and read the email’s content:

Zoetrope’s Fall 2011 release is a specially themed horror edition that includes scary stories from Jim Shepard, Karen Russell, Alexandra Kleeman, and Ryu Murakami.

Are you fucking kidding me?  Those are the authors you pick for your horror issue, Zoetrope?  READ MORE >

Random / 61 Comments
August 24th, 2011 / 12:00 pm

The Millions most-anticipated list for the second half of the year attempts to rip its penis off.

So, wow, Yale just announced $150,ooo literary prizes that’ll be awarded starting in about a year and a half.  Endowed by the late writer Donald Windham, who “specifically requested that writers with no academic affiliation be considered.”  Here’s hoping prizes go to some surprising (in a good way) recipients.